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It comes in a range of different colours (I like black).

This is actually a hollow braid kind of rope; meaning it’s a polypropylene braid wrapped around a core of something. I found it at a Bunnings Warehouse. 5 millimetre tossa jute. Pros:. This is actually a hollow braid kind of rope; meaning it’s a polypropylene braid wrapped around a core of something. I found it at a Bunnings Warehouse. Summary:. If I was going to use this rope, I’d basically stick to your more simple column based ties for restraint. There. End post.

It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. Weighs more than the one above, but that’s not a massive issue. Summary:. Pros:. Has really excellent tooth; you can feel quite certain that your hitches etc will do the job to hold things in place.

It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. Has a really, really nice smell – sort of earthy and warm. You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. Smooth, soft, fast, secure. It actually makes for a decent looking harness over black clothing or similar; I saw someone wearing it at a perversion party once with some fancy Two Knotty Boys knots in it. So, to sum up the whole post:. At the moment, my two favourite ropes are the Twisted Monk Hemp for bedroom ties, and Tossa Jute for absolutely everything else.

Yes, I had to break it in fairly extensively; but once that was done, it’s always served me well. It looks great on a person, particularly after it’s shined up, and is just a really sweet, responsive rope that does pretty much whatever I ask of it. Because it’s a natural fibre rope with decent tooth, you can do shibari and other styles of rope that rely on friction over knots, which is pretty great. You can take some great pictures with it; the rope in these pictures is that same cotton braid. It feels basically like nylon rope, but is nowhere near as pricey. When I last used it in a lesson, the model exclaimed over how nice it felt.

Yes, I had to break it in fairly extensively; but once that was done, it’s always served me well. It looks great on a person, particularly after it’s shined up, and is just a really sweet, responsive rope that does pretty much whatever I ask of it. To your right is a picture of braided cotton rope from one of the many 1-8 dollar shops in my city. It is by far the cheapest useful rope I’ve ever come across. Pros. It’s very light, very smooth, very fast. That said, for restraint, this will generally get the job done. The knots used in the single column and two column ties which I posted about earlier will do a solid job of holding things in place, but feel free to use anything that isn’t a slip knot. Con: Doesn’t take dye as well. That is, the colors will be more muted, less brilliant.

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